Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)


  • POSTED IN FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM), 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

    Introducing Breakthrough TPU Material: Stratasys TPU 92A

    Stacey Clement by Stacey Clement on November 16, 2018

    TPU materialTraditional elastomer prototyping options such as non-FDM or FFF ( Fused Filament Fabrication) additive manufacturing isn’t always ideal. These methods often offer high-cost, limited geometries, can take up to one week, and can’t always create complex geometries. Non-FDM additive manufacturing solutions also offer limited build sizes, higher total part costs, and usually, require an external service bureau. Lower priced options like FFF additive manufacturing have labor-intensive support removal, poor support interface surfaces, and limited part complexity. Although the price may seem most affordable at a glance, the total cost of ownership is high.

    So what is the better option? Resilience - the ability to stretch or compress greatly while not losing shape (and no, I’m not talking about touching your toes). This is the key difference between elastomers, like TPU material, and rigid polymers.

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    • POSTED IN FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM), 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

      Stratasys Materials: When to use Polycarbonate, PC-ABS, and Nylon

      Dan Erickson by Dan Erickson on July 23, 2018

      Stratasys MaterialsWhen you purchase a Stratasys FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) 3D printer, your material options may seem endless, but it’s important to make sure you’re using the best Stratasys materials for your FDM applications. In my previous blog, I discussed understanding ABS, ASA, and PLA Stratasys FDM materials. Today, we're going to focus on Polycarbonate, PC-ABS, and Nylon materials, available to Fortus customers as the Engineering Bundle. Let’s take a look.

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      • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM), STRATASYS

        Stratasys 3D Printers and Fisher Unitech Support Help Reduce Cost of Fixtures 30-40%

        Lisa Hannon by Lisa Hannon on May 16, 2018

        Cooper StandardCooper Standard is a leading global supplier of fluid transfer hoses, fuel and brake lines, rubber and plastic sealing and anti-vibration systems for the automotive industry. The company’s plant in Mt. Sterling, Kentucky produces thousands of different coolant hoses in high volumes for many make and model vehicles. The hose is initially produced in long lengths in a highly automated process then must be trimmed to size, fitted with a clamp and printed with identifying information. These last three and other secondary processes can be far more efficiently performed with the aid of many hundreds of jigs and fixtures that are designed specifically for each of the company’s many different hoses.

        Cooper Standard switched from machining to 3D printing to make these jigs and fixtures, reducing their cost by an average of 30-40%, their lead time by 66% and their weight by 90%. Fisher Unitech printed Cooper Standards fixtures in its own facility for six months to prove a Stratasys 3D printer would do the job, then provided training to help ensure Cooper Standard’s success in printing jigs and fixtures in-house.

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        • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM), STRATASYS

          The Value and Benefits of FDM Sacrificial Tooling

          Angelle Erickson by Angelle Erickson on May 2, 2018

          FDM sacrificial toolingSacrificial tooling is a process that allows designers and engineers to create hollow, seamless, and complex composite structures with smooth internal surfaces and simplified tool removal.

          Some common sacrificial tooling technology that uses eutectic salts, ceramics, cast urethanes, or other similar materials can present several challenges: parts are difficult to handle due to fragile materials, the part requires additional tooling in order to produce, or limitations to create specific geometries occur due to production or removal methods.

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          • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM), STRATASYS

            How to Keep Your 3D Printer in Tip-Top Shape

            Alex Pauley by Alex Pauley on February 28, 2018

            3D Printer maintenanceMost companies have a 3D printing solution that they use on a daily basis. Performing proper 3D printer maintenance will help ensure that your printer keeps running smoothly and continues to kick out parts in the best possible form. During my experience as a 3D printing field technician, I’ve seen several cases that could have been avoided if proper upkeep and routine maintenance were established. In this blog, I’m going to go over some helpful tips and tricks for both PolyJet and FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) 3D printers that will help you keep your projects on schedule, so you don’t fall behind.

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            • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM), STRATASYS

              How to use GrabCAD Print to Make a Multi-Colored Nameplate

              Dan Erickson by Dan Erickson on November 3, 2017

              This is the second part in a two part blog series, where in the first post I designed a simple nameplate using SOLIDWORKS. If you haven't read it yet, you can view it here. In this blog post, I'll prepare the model for printing using GrabCAD Print, the latest 3D Print-Preparation (aka “slicing”) software from Stratasys, and print the model on a Stratasys F370 3D printer.

              One of the design goals outlined in the last article is that the nameplate be attractive and easy to read. I'm happy with the overall design of the part, but I'd like it to have plenty of contrast to make the text easy to read. I can do that by printing the part in two colors. With Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology, a color change requires a material change. So I'll start the print with one color, pause the build at a certain layer and switch materials, then resume the print to complete the part with the second color. I'll need to keep this in mind while orienting the part. Let’s get started.

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              • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING, FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM)

                How Important is Orientation to your 3D Model?

                Alex Pauley by Alex Pauley on July 14, 2017

                How-Important-is-Orientation-to-your-3D-ModelIn the world of 3D Printing, there are many decisions to make before printing your Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) models such as what material to use, what resolution to print at, and even what fill pattern to use. One of the most important aspects of modeling on an FDM machine is the orientation of your model.

                In this blog, I’ll cover five important factors that should be taken into account when picking the best orientation for your model along with aspects to consider when weighing your options.

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                • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING, FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM)

                  How to use GrabCAD Print: FDM

                  Dan Erickson by Dan Erickson on June 2, 2017

                  GrabCAD Print is the latest 3D Print-Preparation (aka "slicing") software from Stratasys. Today, it supports all current Stratasys FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) machines, as well as the J750 Polyjet machine, offering an intuitive user interface with improved scheduling functionality. For a high-level introduction to GrabCAD Print, check out this article. In today's blog, we'll discuss using GrabCAD Print for FDM  in practice, with a real-world example.

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                  • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING, FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM)

                    FDM and Polyjet Additive Manufacturing for Production Parts

                    Rob Stipek by Rob Stipek on August 8, 2016

                    fdmpoly

                    Everyone knows that
                    additive manufacturing is great for taking a CAD design and turning it into a
                    physical model. Prototyping and concept modeling have traditionally been where
                    additive manufacturing has found its niche with production, design, and manufacturing engineers. Today users of professional 3D printers are taking the next steps in the evolution of the technology and finding ways to incorporate additive manufacturing into production parts. Producing end use parts with additive manufacturing technology not only dramatically reduces your production costs and delivery times, it also reduces inventory while creating new supply chain efficiencies and new business models.

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                    • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM), STRATASYS

                      Stratasys Announces New Acceleration Kit for Fortus 900

                      Rob Stipek by Rob Stipek on May 20, 2016
                      Earlier this week Stratasys
                      released a new acceleration kit that will get builds in their
                      F900

                      Fortus 900
                      machines done faster and more effectively. The top of the line Fused Deposition
                      Modeling machine current customers are using features the T20 extruder tip,
                      this can be upgraded to a new T40 tip which will provide customers:

                      ·
                      The largest
                      available slice height for FDM systems.
                      ·
                      Throughput 2-3
                      times faster on average compared to T20 tip.
                      ·
                      Plug-and-play’
                      solution that requires no additional hardware.

                      900 users will need to have the latest controller (Version 3.19) and insight software (Version 10.8) updates in order to utilize the upgraded tip. The Fortus 900 delivers to its customers all the available benefits that Stratasys FDM printers have available, this new tip enables user the ability to continue producing high quality parts, but in a way that enables more control and faster build speeds.

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