3D Printing Materials


  • POSTED IN FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM), 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

    Introducing Breakthrough TPU Material: Stratasys TPU 92A

    Stacey Clement by Stacey Clement on November 16, 2018

    TPU materialTraditional elastomer prototyping options such as non-FDM or FFF ( Fused Filament Fabrication) additive manufacturing isn’t always ideal. These methods often offer high-cost, limited geometries, can take up to one week, and can’t always create complex geometries. Non-FDM additive manufacturing solutions also offer limited build sizes, higher total part costs, and usually, require an external service bureau. Lower priced options like FFF additive manufacturing have labor-intensive support removal, poor support interface surfaces, and limited part complexity. Although the price may seem most affordable at a glance, the total cost of ownership is high.

    So what is the better option? Resilience - the ability to stretch or compress greatly while not losing shape (and no, I’m not talking about touching your toes). This is the key difference between elastomers, like TPU material, and rigid polymers.

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    • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING, 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

      AUTOMAT3D: 3D Printing Support Material Software by PostProcess Technologies

      Gerald Matarazzo by Gerald Matarazzo on September 7, 2018

      3d printing support material removal Since the inception of 3D printing, there have been phenomenal, albeit incremental innovations and improvements with virtually every step of the manufacturing workflow. Part Design has Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) procedures and Generative Design, Pre-Printing setup has software like GrabCAD (part slicing/scheduling/monitoring), and the machines themselves have incrementally increased material catalogs, speed, resolution, and repeatability since their inception. However, some of you may have realized that there has surprisingly been a lack of innovation in one important facet of 3D printing - Post-printing (3D printing support material removal).

      PostProcess Technologies has automated this area of 3D printing, which historically solely relied on precise operator knowledge that would leave a company once that operator left or retired. Deemed “tribal knowledge”, this skillset required dedicated operators who, even though they did excellent work, would not be able to have true repeatability due to the nature of work by hand. The only previous workaround to this would be support washing tanks and tumblers, which were never specifically designed or optimized for 3D printings, nor were their settings customizable. PostProcess Technologies has digitized this formerly analog process with three distinct innovations: software, hardware, and chemistry.

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      • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

        Material Mayhem: 3 Tips For Optimizing FDM 3D Printing Materials

        Gerald Matarazzo by Gerald Matarazzo on August 24, 2018

        3D printing materials3D printing is primarily known for its ability to dramatically increase efficiency in any environment it is applied to. From decreasing prototyping and labor costs, reducing cycle times, and instilling Lean Manufacturing principles (which you can learn more about from my recorded webcast), it is a major player in today’s advanced manufacturing fields. However, there is one facet of the technology that can lead to delays and increased costs if not managed correctly - 3D printing materials.

        As you can imagine, the more 3D printing is integrated into an organization, the more 3D printing materials are used. So, the more optimized your 3D printing process is in your organization, the more important it gets to follow proper material handling practices. Today I will specifically be focusing on FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling), the world’s most popular 3D printing process, and if it’s from Stratasys, the process that uses real thermoplastics.

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        • POSTED IN FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING (FDM), 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

          Stratasys Materials: When to use Polycarbonate, PC-ABS, and Nylon

          Dan Erickson by Dan Erickson on July 23, 2018

          Stratasys MaterialsWhen you purchase a Stratasys FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) 3D printer, your material options may seem endless, but it’s important to make sure you’re using the best Stratasys materials for your FDM applications. In my previous blog, I discussed understanding ABS, ASA, and PLA Stratasys FDM materials. Today, we're going to focus on Polycarbonate, PC-ABS, and Nylon materials, available to Fortus customers as the Engineering Bundle. Let’s take a look.

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          • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, STRATASYS, 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

            Know Your Stratasys FDM Materials: ABS, ASA, and PLA

            Dan Erickson by Dan Erickson on July 9, 2018

            Stratasys FDM MaterialsWhether you are considering the purchase of a Stratasys FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) 3D printer, or already have one, it’s important to us that it be used to its fullest potential. That means using the right materials in the right application. But if you’re new to the world of Additive Manufacturing, you may find the selection of materials to be a bit unfamiliar. In this blog series, I’ll try to shed some light on the Stratasys FDM materials, let you know where they shine, and what to expect when using them. Today I’ll focus on ABS, PLA, and ASA. Read on to learn more!

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            • POSTED IN 3D PRINTING, STRATASYS, 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

              Antero 800NA: The High-Performance Thermoplastic

              Lisa Hannon by Lisa Hannon on May 30, 2018

              Antero 800NA With the rapid adoption of 3D printing across industries, companies are continuously looking for new ways to incorporate additive manufacturing into their workflows and create more efficient processes. While in the past chemicals and other harsh environments would make 3D printing impossible, today companies like Stratasys are creating new materials to meet the requirements of almost every application. Stratasys’ most recent release, Antero 800NA, is a heat and chemical resistant PEKK-based thermoplastic that manufacturers can use to cut costs and design more quickly.

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              • POSTED IN POLYJET, 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

                Stratasys Announces New SUP706 for Polyjet Machines

                Rob Stipek by Rob Stipek on November 17, 2015
                SUP706On Tuesday, Stratasys announced a brand new support material
                available to all Polyjet Connex

                customers, SUP706. Running on all
                triple-jetting 3D printers, SUP706 is compatible with all Polyjet materials,
                the only exception being specifically identified hearing aid materials. This
                new support material opens up doors to print even more detail geometries and
                reduces the already low design constrictions Polyjet users have. Key benefits
                to the new Sup706 include.

                •  Maximize productivity of your triple-jetting
                  system and achieve a low TCO per part with easy, two-step automated support
                  removal
                •  More design freedom with the ability to easily
                  remove support material from delicate features and small cavities
                • Faster and easier water-jet removal and improved glossy-mode performance

                 

                For more information on how you can take advantage of the
                benefits of SUP706 please contact material@fisherunitech.com.

              • POSTED IN STRATASYS, 3D PRINTING MATERIALS

                BREAKING THE BOND: The New ABS-ESD7 Static Dissipative Plastic

                Angelle Erickson by Angelle Erickson on August 2, 2011

                The New ABS-ESD7 Static Dissipative PlasticStratasys has announced the new ABS-ESD7 static dissipative material.  If static charge can damage your products, impair their performance or even cause an explosion, try ABS-ESD7.

                Ideal for protecting electronics from damage caused by electrostatic discharge (static shock), preventing fire and explosion (static spark) and preserving equipment (static cling), parts built with ABS-ESD7 will have a target surface resistance of 10^7 ohms and typically a range between 10^9 ohms to 10^6 ohms.

                 

                Break the bond between manufacturing tools and your products.

                Fortus 400mc and 900mc 3D Production Systems can now use ABS-ESD7 to quickly and inexpensively produce static dissipative jigs, fixtures and functional prototypes.

                The New ABS-ESD7 Static Dissipative PlasticDownload the material specs Have More Questions?  E-Mail Our Engineers.

                 

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